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Scott Simmons

"Inspiration for me comes from all directions, a dance, a painting, a sunset, a fish. I try to bring the emotion and spontaneity of a performance to the creation of a new piece. All the setup, all the test pieces and trials, are like rehearsal. When I pick up a blowpipe the curtain goes up and the world shrinks down to the droplet of fire on the end of the pipe. When I get it right a new piece will make me laugh out loud."

Scott Simmons began blowing glass in 1993. He received his training at the University of Wisconsin, where he had worked as a biological researcher. In 1997 Simmons built a hot glass studio at his home where he blows glass all winter and gardens in the summer.

Development of the work is intuitive and process oriented. Scott makes a piece, reacts to it, tries something else. Once Simmons begins working on a form he will spend days or weeks repeating it, varying it, playing with color and decoration. Sometimes this leads to a logical endpoint. Other times the piece morphs into something completely different.

Simmons' recent work involves the use of murrini to explore complex color relationships. Opaque and transparent colored glasses are layered and drawn out into patterned canes, cut up, recombined and drawn out again, then clipped into murrini. The murrini are laid out in a rectangular design on a hot plate and picked up on the outside of a bubble of hot glass. This is blown into a sphere, which is spun out into a plate on which the original rectangular design runs in a ring. The colors stretch and run and do unexpected things.

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